Hiring a new leader can be stressful for a company’s C-suite, employees, and the new executive. Staff may equate a new face in the C-suite to major corporate or brand changes, and even job insecurity if the company is looking for an operational overhaul. These factors can make it difficult for a new executive to be met with a warm reception and smooth transition to their new role – but it does not need to be that way.

There are ways to identify, introduce, and welcome a new leader to ensure that they are set up for success with their new team, as well as in the job that they have been hired to do.

As a hiring professional that specializes in executive search, I have found that there are actions that both the company and the candidate can take to ensure an effortless transition.

  1. Finding the Right Fit
    1. Company: Especially when the role to be filled is a pivotal one, there will be varying opinions from the board, fellow C-suite members, and key stakeholders on what an ideal fit would look like. It is important to identify an internal search committee consisting of a handful of key stakeholders to manage candidate interviewing. Companies should consider working with a search firm to interview candidates and internal stakeholders to identify challenges and key messages. In order to identify candidates with strong industry knowledge and tactical experience, transparency is key. Having the opinions of key stakeholders streamlined by a third party will ensure the candidate pool consists of the best additions to the culture and a skillset that matches to help move the organization’s goals forward.
    2. Candidate: In today’s world, a proactive and mindful leader is essential. Leading a company successfully requires a passion for the brand, the mission, and the future of the business. The candidate should ask questions throughout the interview process to determine the company’s values, vision, and culture so that they can make an informed decision about whether their leadership style and goals align with the business. In order to add to the business’s success, a candidate needs to be sure that they are appropriately qualified to enhance and build upon the current state of the business and its culture.
  1. Organizing the Onboarding Process
    1. Company: Prior to a new executive starting, the organization needs to provide the necessary tools and culture for an efficient onboarding process. I recommend coordinating pre-scheduled meetings with fellow members of the C-suite, board, and key stakeholders, so that on day one they can understand where the company is and where it should go. Additionally, this will build a positive rapport with colleagues from the start, ensuring that the new hire feels supported and comfortable involving them when appropriate. When leaders and employees interact effectively, they are more likely to be engaged and inspired.
    2. Candidate: Being a good leader is a never-ending journey and it starts before the first “official” day. The candidate should come into their new role with as much research done as possible about the company they are going to lead. This includes reviewing all articles and available reports, familiarizing oneself with c-suite and board members, and coming prepared with ideas and goals in mind to move the company forward to its next chapter. This will not only earn the respect of stakeholders initially but will also help decrease time spent acclimating to the new role and can be spent making valuable contributions and improvements. As a leader, trust is the most valuable asset.  If a leader shows their commitment and passion for a new role, it will be seen and felt by those around them and begin to build the foundation of trust.
  1. Introducing the New Leader to Staff
    1. Company: As staff will likely be feeling uneasy about a change in the leadership of the business, leaders must have important conversations with staff before the new executive hire starts. A new leadership hire should never be a surprise or shock to staff, and meetings should be held safely in person or virtually to talk through and address any concerns staff may have about the change before the new hire assumes his or her role. This may be a good time to discuss professional development or specific needs with other key staff members.  Occasionally, there are internal employees who applied for the job but are not awarded the position.  Now is the time to develop or discuss how to continue their engagement and professional development within the organization.  When applicable, we propose that internal applicants are paired with leadership coaches.  This shows the employee that the company wants them there and they are invested in their success.  This will also encourage staff to be welcoming to the candidate who was successfully chosen for the position.
    2. Candidates: Leaders work for their people and to be successful, they should try to understand their new employees’ needs and motivations. Kindness tends to have a greater impact and typically new leaders have more success when they build up their inherited team rather than tear it down. New hires should position themselves as accessible and approachable from day one. This includes taking a stroll through the office and stopping (within a safe distance) to introduce themselves or reaching out virtually to members of the team with a short intro and hello. When a new leader can build meaningful relationships, it will take the guesswork out of who they are and how much they care. The sooner a new hire humanizes themselves to their staff, the quicker employees will feel comfortable accepting them as leaders.

Candidates and companies both play important roles in ensuring a smooth introduction of a new leader to the business. By planning appropriately, and exercising transparency, new leaders can enhance all facets of business starting on their very first day.

For more information and support with your next executive and leadership search, visit www.jkexec.com.

One of the most common misconceptions that I hear from jobseekers is that the Q4 holiday season between Halloween and New Years isn’t a good time to look for new opportunities. Believe it or not, the end of the year is consistently the busiest hiring season for myself and my team at JK Executive Strategies – with 70% of our current active searches coming in at the start of Q4.

Companies will hire when they need people, despite what time of year it is, so jobseekers shouldn’t pause their search when the holidays come around. However, hiring around the holiday season can look a bit different than other times of year, and it’s important that both candidates and corporate leaders are willing and able to adjust accordingly in order to foster a successful match.

Here are some ways that candidates and leaders can ensure that the holiday hiring process goes smoothly:

  1. Applying
    1. Candidates: When looking for new opportunities, do some research into what industries thrive during Q4 and may be looking for new talent. For example, for manufacturing and financial services, the year-end is the busiest time of year, presenting the greatest need for an increase in staff. Be flexible with your search criteria and you’re sure to find enticing openings.
    2. Leaders: Especially for smaller businesses, the biggest hurdle to plan for in reviewing applications during the holidays is making sure that someone on staff is there to move the hiring process forward. The holiday season is understandably the most popular time of the year for PTO, so working with a staffing agency partner to identify top candidates will help to ensure the process moves along efficiently.
  1. Interviewing
    1. Candidates: Prepare for a shorter interview process. With COVID-19 and the holidays meaning more staff are out of office, scheduling windows become tighter and hiring moves faster. Depending on the level of the job and your availability, if you submit your application on December 1 – you could very well be starting before Christmas.
    2. Leaders: Consistency is key. Be aware of employee time off so you can ensure that the same staff member is able to guide an interviewee through the process from start to finish. When too many staff members get involved in the interview process, feedback can be skewed, disorganized and inconsistent, making it harder to make final hiring decisions.
  1. Onboarding
    1. Candidates: Expect a non-traditional onboarding process. Especially with COVID-19 persisting through the holiday season, and staff members taking time off or working remote while visiting family, it is more likely than ever that holiday hires will be onboarded remotely. Take time to carefully read through all of the documents sent to you ahead of time, and come to meetings with your HR team or new manager with prepared questions to ensure that you have a clear understanding of your role and responsibilities.
    2. Leaders: Stay organized. The most important factor for onboarding during the holidays is making sure that someone will always be available to the new hire to answer questions and walk them through important documents. Have an onboarding schedule prepared before staff starts taking time off to make sure the new employee feels valued. Also, don’t forget that the new employee has family they will likely want to spend time with over the holidays as well, so be open to allowing them time off early on.

While hiring through the holidays can be intimidating for both jobseekers and corporate leaders, it’s important to not let stigmas around the season get in the way of finding the ideal culture and skillset match. Partnering with a staffing firm can help to remove holiday roadblocks and ensure that companies are matched with qualified, diverse candidates that are right for the job before the start of Q1.

For more information on hiring and job opportunities, visit jkexec.com.

For those who love podcasts, check out our top diversity and inclusion Ted Talks to listen to right now.

Ted Talk: A Blueprint for Diversity in the workplace:

How Diversity Makes Teams More Innovative

How Language Shapes the Way We Think

  • https://www.ted.com/talks/lera_boroditsky_how_language_shapes_the_way_we_think?referrer=playlist-a_blueprint_for_diversity_in_the_workplace
  • There are about 7,000 languages spoken around the world — and they all have different sounds, vocabularies and structures. But do they shape the way we think? Cognitive scientist Lera Boroditsky shares examples of language — from an Aboriginal community in Australia that uses cardinal directions instead of left and right to the multiple words for blue in Russian — that suggest the answer is a resounding yes. “The beauty of linguistic diversity is that it reveals to us just how ingenious and how flexible the human mind is,” Boroditsky says. “Human minds have invented not one cognitive universe, but 7,000.”

How to Get Serious About Diversity and Inclusion in the Workplace

The Power of Diversity Within Yourself

  • https://www.ted.com/talks/rebeca_hwang_the_power_of_diversity_within_yourself?referrer=playlist-a_blueprint_for_diversity_in_the_workplace
  • Rebeca Hwang has spent a lifetime juggling identities — Korean heritage, Argentinian upbringing, education in the United States — and for a long time she had difficulty finding a place in the world to call home. Yet along with these challenges came a pivotal realization: that a diverse background is a distinct advantage in today’s globalized world. In this personal talk, Hwang reveals the endless benefits of embracing our complex identities — and shares her hopes for creating a world where identities aren’t used to alienate but to bring people together instead.

Lead Like the Great Conductors

 

Ted Talk Radio Hour:

The Consequences of Racism

 Playing with Perceptions

 Why We Hate 

 The Right To Speak 

 

We curated this content for our clients because we believe that diversity makes an organization stronger. We are committed to listening and engaging in action and supporting our clients who choose to do the same. We are focused on a more inclusive and justified world and remain dedicated to promoting diversity, equity and inclusion in the workplace and in the communities we serve.

Below is JK Executive Strategies top 3 diversity and inclusion resources to review right now.

 

1) Ted Talk: The urgency of intersectionality by Kimberlé Crenshaw:   

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=akOe5-UsQ2o

This tool is designed for a variety of group dynamics and settings and is great team building exercise focused on building stronger interpersonal connections through vulnerability and openness. Watch the video (see link) and then fill out the intersectionality worksheet. The goal of this exercise is to build empathy and trust.  

Through this exercise, participants will explore the identities of others, which break down walls and open perspective. The exercise is most effective when the facilitator creates a climate conducive for genuine sharing and intimacy- Think safe space.

We suggest the facilitator fill out their worksheet ahead of time and share first, leading by example. This will set the tone for the rest of the group.

JK Executive Strategies recommends this exercise as it can be facilitated without extensive training.

Be sure to share outcomes of the experience with us by commenting below!

Identities Circle Worksheet

 

2) SHRM: How to Develop a Diversity and Inclusion Initiative

https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/tools-and-samples/how-to-guides/pages/how-to-develop-a-diversity-and-inclusion-initiative.aspx

Different perspectives spark creativity and enhance innovation. Developing a diversity and inclusion initiative involves four main phases:

  1. Data collection and analysis to determine the need for change.
  2. Strategy design to match business objectives.
  3. Implementation of the initiative.
  4. Evaluation and continuing audit of the plan.

This article will provide a nine step break down of these main phases into action steps employers can take to develop a diversity and inclusion initiative.

 

3) SHRM: 6 Steps for Building an Inclusive Workplace

https://www.shrm.org/hr-today/news/hr-magazine/0418/pages/6-steps-for-building-an-inclusive-workplace.aspx

In this SHRM article, you’ll find six practical strategies for creating an inclusive environment.

“To get workplace diversity and inclusion right, you need to build a culture where everyone feels valued and heard.” Kathy Gurchiek

When employees who are different from their colleagues are allowed to flourish, the company benefits from their ideas, skills and engagement.

 

Our HR Consulting Division works with companies on new policies and procedures. During this time, companies are adjusting to the “new normal” while the governments are releasing new work policies.

Attached is a checklist with of the Top 10 HR Compliance Topics you may download and use to ensure your compliant with the new changes!

If you have trouble downloading, please contact any member of our team. We are here for you always.

Didn’t check off all the boxes?
Don’t Stress!
Find out how we can help you!

Top 10 Hot HR Compliance Topics

Our HR Consulting Division works with companies on new policies and procedures. During this time, companies are switching to remote work for the first time.

Attached is a draft policy you may download and use as you transition your employees from office or corporate to remote.

If you have trouble downloading, please contact any member of our team. We are here for you always.

 

Remote Work Policy & Agreement

How to Maintain H/R Files Properly

Each employer has its own unique employment record maintenance practices. Employee records can be maintained in paper form, scanned or completed and maintained electronically. No matter what format is used, the maintenance, security and retention requirements are the same.

Employers must have at least three different “employee files” on each employee. The main personnel file that contains employee performance and job-related information; the medical/confidential file that contains protected, non-job-related or confidential medical information; and the payroll file that contains payroll, garnishment and other pay-related information.  I-9 files, Background Check reports including Credit Checks, and Workers’ Comp paperwork should always be maintained separately. Employers must give special consideration to where and how they maintain these files, limiting access to those with a need-to-know only and protecting applicants and employees from discrimination, identity theft, breach of privacy, and HIPAA violations. Normally, only the HR Manager and the CEO/President have access to these files.

Remember the following:

  • Access is highly restricted to employee files and should always be kept in locked cabinets which are locked throughout the day.
  • Managers and Supervisors should have access or can request access to personnel files only to assist them in making employment decisions.
  • Hiring records should not be in personnel files and that includes any job requisitions and job postings, interview notes, reference checks (however, hired employee’s application and resume should be stored in the personnel file).
  • If information is related to the employee’s performance, knowledge, skills, and abilities then it belongs in the personnel file.

What should be included in the personnel file?

  • Job descriptions.
  • Offer letters, promotion, demotion, transfer, layoff, and education and training records.
  • Records relating to other employment practices (including policy acknowledgments and agreements).
  • Letters of recognition.
  • Disciplinary notices or documents.
  • Performance evaluations and goal setting records.
  • Copies of certifications, licenses, degrees.
  • Termination records.

What should be included in the payroll file?

  • W-4s, state withholding forms.
  • Pay information.
  • Wage deduction acknowledgements.
  • Benefit enrollment forms.
  • Time keeping records.
  • Wage Theft Protection Act forms.
  • Disability, FMLA paperwork.
  • Leave paperwork; i.e. – Jury Duty, Military, etc.
  • Employment verifications.

What should be included in the medical/confidential file?

  • Medical information- doctor’s notes, employee’s physical exam information.
  • SSNs or other protected class information such as age, race, gender, national origin, disability, marital status, religious beliefs.
  • Harassment and other grievance complaints.
  • Investigation notes.
  • Reasonable accommodation documentation.
  • Arrest records.
  • Drug tests.
  • Motor Vehicle Records.
  • EEO and AAP information.
  • Hiring Records-pre-employment testing, background checks, etc.

By Ann Maynard. www.jkexec.com

As a senior HR executive, Ann Maynard leverages more than twenty years of progressive experience in all areas of human resources (at start-ups and Fortune 500 companies) bringing clear understanding and rational processes toward adaption, integration and compliance to her clients. Find out more at www.jkexec.com

FLSA Exemption Questionnaire – NYS

Note to employers: This questionnaire serves as a basic outline for an employer’s initial analysis of positions being considered for exemption under the FLSA and is meant to serve as one of several tools in such an analysis. Job titles are insufficient to determine exempt status. Additionally, state wage and hour laws may have different requirements.

Position Title: __________________________________

Employee: ____________________________________

Date: _________________________________________

Completed by: _________________________________

Completion of this questionnaire helps determine the exemption status of a position. Check the appropriate exemption (executive, administrative, professional, computer-related, outside sales or highly compensated), then check all boxes under the selected exemption that are applicable. To qualify for an exemption, all boxes must be checked for that exemption.

EXECUTIVE (examples: chief executive officer, controller, vice president, director)

  •  Regularly receives a predetermined amount of pay constituting all or part of the employee’s salary, which is not subject to reduction because of variations in the DOL’s quality or quantity of work performed.
  •  Is paid at least $885 weekly (effective Jan. 1, 2020).
  •  Primary duty consists of managing the enterprise or a customarily recognized department or subdivision of the enterprise.
  •  Customarily and regularly directs the work of two or more full-time employees or their equivalents (for example, one full-time employee and two half-time employees).
  •  Has the authority to hire or fire other employees OR makes recommendations that carry weight as to the hiring, firing, advancement, promotion or any other change in status of other employees.

ADMINISTRATIVE (examples: manager, supervisor, administrator)

  •  Regularly receives a predetermined amount of pay constituting all or part of the employee’s salary, which is not subject to reduction because of variations in the quality or quantity of work performed.
  •  Is paid at least $885 weekly (effective Jan. 1, 2020).
  •  Primary duty consists of performing office or nonmanual work directly related to the management or general business operations of the employer or the employer’s customers.
  •  Work includes the exercise of discretion and independent judgment with respect to matters of significance.

PROFESSIONAL: LEARNED AND CREATIVE (examples: accountant, nurse, engineer, composer, singer, graphic designer)

  •  Regularly receives a predetermined amount of pay constituting all or part of the employee’s salary, which is not subject to reduction because of variations in the quality or quantity of work performed.
  •  Is paid at least $885 weekly (effective Jan. 1, 2020). Note: For teachers, licensed or certified practitioners of law and medicine, and medical interns and residents covered under this exemption, the salary basis and salary requirements do NOT apply.

Learned Professional

  •  Primary duty consists of the performance of work that requires advanced knowledge (beyond high school) and that is predominantly intellectual in character and consistently includes the exercise of discretion and independent judgment.
  •  The advanced knowledge is in a field of science or learning.
  •  The advanced knowledge was acquired by a prolonged course of specialized intellectual instruction. (This knowledge may be demonstrated either by possessing the appropriate academic degree or by having substantially the same knowledge level and performing substantially the same work as degreed employees but possessing advanced knowledge only through a combination of work experience and intellectual instruction.)

Creative Professional

  •  Primary duty consists of the performance of work requiring invention, imagination, originality or talent in a recognized field of artistic or creative endeavor as opposed to routine mental, manual, mechanical or physical work.

COMPUTER-RELATED (examples: network or database analyst, developer, programmer, software engineer)

  •  Is paid at least $885 weekly (effective Jan. 1, 2020) OR $27.63 per hour. That is, this exemption does NOT have to meet the salary basis requirement to regularly receive a predetermined amount of pay constituting all or part of the employee’s salary, which is not subject to reduction because of variations in the quality or quantity of work performed, IF paid at least $27.63 on an hourly basis.
  •  Primary duty consists of:
  • The application of system-analyst techniques and procedures, including consulting with users to determine hardware, software or systems functional specifications, OR
  • The design, development, documentation, analysis, creation, testing or modification of computer systems or programs, OR
  • The design, documentation, testing, creation or modification of computer programs related to machine-operating systems, OR
  • A combination of these duties which requires the same level of skills.

OUTSIDE SALES (examples: salespeople, contract negotiators)

  • The salary basis and salary requirements do NOT apply for this exemption. That is, this exemption does NOT have the salary basis requirement to regularly receive a predetermined amount of pay constituting all or part of the employee’s salary, AND this exemption does NOT require payment of a minimum salary. Commission-only pay is allowable under this exemption.
  •  Primary duty consists of making sales or obtaining orders for contracts for services, or for the use of facilities for which consideration will be paid by the client or customer.
  •  Customarily and regularly is engaged away from the employer’s place or places of business.

HIGHLY COMPENSATED EMPLOYEES PERFORMING EXECUTIVE,
PROFESSIONAL OR ADMINISTRATIVE DUTIES

  •  Is paid an annual total compensation of $107,432 or more, which includes at least $885 per week paid on a salary basis (effective January 1, 2020). The required total annual compensation of $107,432 or more may consist of commissions, nondiscretionary bonuses and other nondiscretionary compensation earned during a 52-week period, but does not include credit for board or lodging, payments for medical or life insurance, or contributions to retirement plans or other fringe benefits.
  •  Primary duty consists of performing nonmanual office work. Note: No matter how highly paid, manual workers or other blue-collar workers, including non-management construction workers, who perform work involving repetitive operations with their hands, physical skill and energy are not eligible for this exemption.
  •  Customarily and regularly performs at least one of the exempt duties or responsibilities of the executive, professional or administrative exemption.

 

By Ann Maynard. www.jkexec.com

As a senior HR executive, Ann Maynard leverages more than twenty years of progressive experience in all areas of human resources (at start-ups and Fortune 500 companies) bringing clear understanding and rational processes toward adaption, integration and compliance to her clients. Find out more at www.jkexec.com

HR Compliance 101

Companies of all sizes face increasing HR complexities as the number of employment laws and regulations are on the rise, and the risk of penalties for non-compliance has never been greater. When developing HR policies and procedures, HR leaders should know, for example, that:

  • An employer must follow employment laws, including applicable federal, state, and local regulations.
  • A business may be subject to an audit from an enforcing agency that may levy fines and penalties for non-compliance.
  • Not knowing or understanding your compliance obligations is not an acceptable legal defense.

 What is HR’s role in compliance?

One of the key roles of HR departments is bridging the gap between the company’s strategic growth and objectives — and compliance practices that influence activities such as hiring, employee development, and retention.

Understanding the company’s strategic priorities lays the foundation for a better understanding of how compliance concerns may impact decisions. HR goals should be designed to support company strategy, yet they must also consider compliance implications.

What are some examples of HR compliance issues?

HR related compliance centers around employee-related matters, including when and how to pay overtime, employee documentation that must be maintained, administering benefits, hiring procedures and separation policies. Some examples of issues you might face include the following:

Recruiting Strategies

If your goal is to increase diversity within your organization, what compliance factors come into play when reaching out to potential candidates? How does managing costs for benefits and compensation amid the federal, state, and local laws that regulate these areas impact what path your company will follow?

Form I-9

Form I-9 is used to verify both the identity of new employees and their authorization to work in the United States. Make sure you are up to date on the following items:

  • Document storage requirements
  • How to complete a Form I-9 and deadlines for completion, based on employee’s hire date
  • Understand that you cannot mandate what specific documents a new hire presents (they’re permitted to present any allowable document(s) listed on the form)
  • The impact of errors; if any part of the form is completed incorrectly, fines can be costly

You must ensure that Forms I-9 are completed in a timely manner and in compliance with the regulations and guidance provided, and that they are properly retained on file.

With immigration issues at the forefront of enforcement, complying with the most recent standards and requirements for employment verification should be on top of an HR leader’s compliance checklist.

Non-discriminatory hiring

Federal anti-discrimination laws enforced by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) include the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA), and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, all of which prohibit discrimination in employment based on protected classes. It’s important to ensure a workplace free of discrimination in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws.

When it comes to compliance with these laws, employers should ask themselves:

  • Do I know which federal, state, and local employment laws prohibiting discrimination in recruitment and hiring apply to my business? Antibullying and/or sexual harassment prevention?
  • Have my managers been trained on these laws recently? Annually?
  • Do I have policies in place to communicate our efforts to comply with these laws? Policy sign-offs?
  • Have I analyzed company practices for making employment decisions including recruitment, hiring, promotion, and access to training? Metrics?

Exempt vs. non-exempt status 

Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) regulations regarding employee classifications for exempt versus non-exempt status are often confused with the designation of hourly versus salaried employee payment methods.

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) aims to ensure employees are paid in compliance with the federal wage and hour law. Under the law, employees are classified as either exempt or non-exempt from some or all of the provisions of the FLSA. Non-exempt employees must be paid at least minimum wage for all hours worked up to 40 in a workweek and the applicable overtime rate for hours worked over 40 in a workweek.

Pay issues

Does your regular rate of pay include wages, commissions, shift or job differential, premium pay for hazardous work, non-discretionary bonuses, and other incentive payments? Include them in your calculations for overtime where applicable and avoid shortcuts, such as averaging hours over multiple workweeks.

Off-the-clock work

Employees must record all hours worked, including work performed outside of regular working hours or off work premises even if the work was not authorized or requested. It’s your responsibility to make sure time cards are correct.

However, employers should avoid adjusting the weekly salary of an exempt employee due to the quantity of hours worked. Such action could jeopardize the salary basis test and the individual’s exempt status.

Travel time

Traveling from home to work and back doesn’t generally count as paid travel time, but travel from one job site to another will likely be compensable and count as time worked for non-exempt employees.

For home-based workers, traveling to the office may be considered compensable and time worked. Other types of travel may also be considered compensable under federal and state wage and hour regulations.

Maintaining Employee Records

Each employer has its own unique employment record maintenance practices. Employee records can be maintained in paper form, scanned or completed and maintained electronically. No matter what format is used, the maintenance, security and retention requirements are the same.

Employers must have at least three different employment record files on each employee. The main personnel file that contains employee performance and job-related information; the medical/confidential file that contains protected, non-job-related or confidential medical information; and the payroll file that contains payroll, garnishment and other pay-related information.  I-9 files, Background Check reports including Credit Checks, and Workers’ Comp paperwork should always be maintained separately. Employers must give special consideration to where and how they maintain these files, limiting access to those with a need-to-know only and protecting applicants and employees from discrimination, identity theft, breach of privacy, and HIPAA violations

Effective ways to keep up with compliance issues

Ensuring compliance in HR can be a tall order, but here are two pointers to get you started:

  1. Conduct an internal human resource audit of strengths and weaknesses of existing compliance levels. If unsure about where to begin, seek a subject matter expert’s advice or research requirements on the enforcing government agency’s website.
  2. Ensure that anyone accountable for compliance in the organization is properly trained. Remember, supervisors and managers represent the business in day-to-day employment decisions.

Once you gain a thorough understanding of your current practices and identify any gaps that may lead to compliance issues, you can begin to set priorities and draw up a plan to strengthen your processes.

An HR compliance checklist for businesses

Ultimately, it is critical that today’s HR leaders balance HR strategy and compliance. By instilling an overarching strategy that lays out your company’s goals and objectives – and ties that to compliance planning — employers can make more informed decisions that may minimize risk and keep compliance as an achievable goal.

Many organizations find it useful to develop a checklist that functions as a reminder for areas that they must keep in mind at all times. Some key areas to monitor and ensure compliance at all times include:

  • Completion and compliant retention of Form I-9
  • Ensuring non-discriminatory hiring practices
  • Accurate classification of exempt vs. non-exempt employees

When compliance is part of the decision-making process, it’s immediately highlighted on how different outcomes could impact business performance.

 

By Ann Maynard. www.jkexec.com

As a senior HR executive, Ann Maynard leverages more than twenty years of progressive experience in all areas of human resources (at start-ups and Fortune 500 companies) bringing clear understanding and rational processes toward adaption, integration and compliance to her clients. Find out more at www.jkexec.com

Why is HR Vital for Small Businesses?

For small businesses, the Human Resources function can be helpful for much more than simply processing payroll or handling the annual open enrollment season. Human Resources plays an essential role in developing a company’s strategy as well as handling the employee-centered activities of an organization.

Human Resources curbs excessive spending through developing methods for trimming workforce management costs, which includes negotiating better rates for benefits such as health care coverage. In addition, Human Resources ensures competitive and realistic wage-setting based on studying the labor market, employment trends and salary analysis based on job functions. As some small businesses have budget constraints, this Human Resources function is especially helpful.

An effective HR audit looks into every discipline of the human resources function. The purpose of an HR audit is to determine if your organization’s policies are current and if they comply with federal and state laws governing the workplace.

Human Resource audits involve an organization’s strategic actions to take an intensely objective look at its HR policies, procedures and practices. This type of comprehensive review of the company’s current state can help identify whether specific practice areas or processes are adequate, legal and effective. The results obtained from this review can help identify gaps in HR practices, and HR can then prioritize these gaps in an effort to minimize lawsuits and regulatory violations, as well as to achieve and maintain world-class competitiveness in key HR practice areas.

Offering an employee bonus plan will motivate employees to improve their job performance and help the business achieve its goals. A company tends to be more attractive to prospective applicants or candidates for a job if they know that the business has employee bonus plans for its employees.

Creating incentive plans have the potential to raise morale and increase job satisfaction in a company. Additionally, staffers with high levels of job satisfaction often exhibit lower degrees of absenteeism, which can also help improve a company’s bottom line.

Employers also use the policies in an employee handbook to provide the roadmap to the ethical and legal treatment of employees. It allows the employer to know that employees are informed about actions and behaviors that will warrant disciplinary action up to and including employment termination in their workplace.

Finally, from hiring the right candidates, to improving company morale and ensuring high overall performance standards while resolving employee conflicts, these are some of the reasons why HR is so crucial for business success.

 

By Ann Maynard. www.jkexec.com

As a senior HR executive, Ann Maynard leverages more than twenty years of progressive experience in all areas of human resources (at start-ups and Fortune 500 companies) bringing clear understanding and rational processes toward adaption, integration and compliance to her clients. Find out more at www.jkexec.com